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  • The Relationship Between Herpes and HIV Posted by Admin

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    Do you know that herpes and HIV are two different STIs, but are related somewhat? You are afraid to hear that the rate of herpes infection is on the high side among those living with HIV when compared to the people without the herpes virus.

    The fact that HIV and Herpes have a tiny line between them can never be disputed. The risk of contracting HIV is high when there are genital ulcers – which is a visible symptom of genital herpes. Having genital sores resulting from herpes infection causes several immune cells to concentrate on the sore region. When an HIV-infected semen, blood or vaginal fluid comes in contact with such sore spots, the HIV transmission becomes easier. Those immune cells that concentrate on the sore spot are vulnerable to the HIV and other infections, causing an easy transmission.

    Likewise, the known history of herpes virus is altered by the HIV as they are related. Consequently, detecting and alleviating the herpes virus can lower the risk of HIV.

    HIV is a virus that deteriorates into AIDS with time, you bet it is! On the face of it, this can be possible quickly when there is a form of accelerator. Here's it: Having herpes virus quickens the replication of HIV, unlike the way it should have been in the absence of the herpes virus. When the HIV replicates faster than normal, it fights the body’s defense system easily and at faster rate, as such causing HIV to turn into AIDS in a short while. One of the reasons you should avoid this related duo.

    The activities of the herpes virus in the human body tend to cause more replication of the HIV, causing a high possibility of transmission to a sexual partner. Likewise, HIV alters the effect of the immune system negatively, leading to prolonged and more active sores and outbreaks – the period when herpes virus is highly transmissible It is evident that the human immune system thrives and functions much well when it is free from attacks – viruses and other harmful organisms, but struggles and gets to work when it is faced with a challenge. That’s right, having HIV and the herpes virus becomes a significant problem for the body immune system. They get to work and are destroyed easily. Consequently, people infected with the HIV and herpes virus are prone to crisis and severe outbreaks often due to the immune’s inability to curtail or manage the infections very well.

    When you talk about the relationship between Herpes and HIV and how it affects the body system in general, it may not be wrong to discuss its effect that spreads over the treatment or alleviation of these health conditions. Having HIV and genital herpes poses more problems during therapy because of the need for a higher antiviral dose to combat one of the diseases living with the other or even both STIs. Then again, people living with HIV and herpes may resist certain antiviral treatments due to certain strains of the herpes virus.

    On the face of it, having herpes makes you susceptible to HIV which may deteriorate to AIDS – these two STIs are not friendly to the human body, and they can cause more harm and destruction to the immune system when they live together in the same body system. On the other hand, having herpes does not mean that HIV must invade the same body system. No matter the level of outbreak or crisis of genital herpes, if you are not exposed to HIV, you cannot contract it.

    While cures for genital herpes and HIV are not yet sure, they can be controlled with different available medications - the fundamental step towards achieving this is by getting tested. If you feel you have been exposed, go for test quickly and know your status. Remember that healthy and safe sex is a key to living a virus-free sexual life. However, if you are diagnosed with having any or both STIs, do not fret, rather try to live a normal life and don’t infect others. Anti-viral medications are always there to keep these STIs on a low level of operations.

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